Tech Startup Guide to Designing an Effective Landing Page That Converts your SaaS Product

Are you part of a brand new tech startup, looking for ways to effectively convert your SaaS product?

SaaS is widely tipped to become the future of digital consumerism. It is an innovative platform, allowing users to access software and licensing via a subscription, as opposed to an individual purchase and installation.

Of course, SaaS comes with many benefits. For the customers, who can access a desirable service at minimal cost, and also for businesses, who can charge an inflated price for the convenience of monthly payments.

Naturally, many new tech startup businesses and software designers are looking to use SaaS to their own advantage. As the technology is an integral part of the digital age, these businesses will need their own website – one that will not only explain the product in an engaging way, but will convert viewers into buyers.

The very first thing that viewers will see is the landing page – this is your product ‘home’ page. This is where any links should redirect. The most important thing to incorporate into SaaS conversion is a successful landing page design – this is one of the biggest factors that WILL sell your product.

It’s important to note your landing page should shine with your brand. If you haven’t read our article on Why Branding is Essential for Tech Startups, then make sure you give it a read.

Stats and Figures On Having a Creat Landing Page Design

To really clarify why a well-designed landing page is essential for any upcoming tech startup, let’s have a look at the metrics.

A well designed landing page can generate a significantly higher conversion rate, which is why optimisation is necessary.

According to statistics found through WordStream, a longer landing page can generate up to 220% more leads – that’s more than double than what a poorly designed page might offer.

Form fields are essential to generate leads, but many startups go overboard, offering around 11 different forms. In fact, reducing this down to 4 can result in a 120% increase!

Here’s some more information that might help design that perfect landing page:

  • If you don’t ask for an age, your conversion will increase
  • Including a navigation bar could decrease your conversion rate by 100%
  • An average conversion rate is 2.35%. A poorly designed page might see conversions of less than 1%, whereas a well-designed page might generate up to a 15% conversion for your tech startup!

So, What Makes a Great Landing Page?

Designing a landing page for your tech startup

You know how important it is to have an eye-catching website that sells your product, but what exactly makes it great? What do you need to consider to make sure that your landing page is visually pleasing and informal in an ever-changing virtual landscape?

Here, we’ll look at some of the key things to consider when you design your landing page.

Simplicity

Less is more, so the saying goes, and it’s true for a number of reasons. A simple web page is visually appealing – clutter makes for distractions, and will turn what could be a stunning page into a mess.

A simple landing page will redirect a viewer’s attention to exactly what matters, whether that’s a brief on why they need your product, or a simple form to encourage them to sign up. This means that not only are you telling them how your SaaS product will help them, but also shows them how to convert!

Simplicity doesn’t just apply to the visuals, and shuld affect any content you choose to put up. Make sure everything is clear, concise, informative and easy to read!

Colour Schemes

Colour of tech startup landing page design

Have a look at some of the most well-known SaaS products, and take note of how their websites have been designed.

One trait carried across most successful SaaS websites is that they have a select colour scheme, which is a clever branding mechanism wherein a company can use colours to associate certain products to their users.

In most cases, the colour schemes are very minimal, usually with only two or three different colours displayed on the landing page.

A great example of this is our own website, Jupiter and the Giraffe. Our landing page colours consist of a dark blue background with a large red circle, a pale blue ‘cookie’ pop-up and easy to read white text.

This is then carried prominently throughout the rest of the website, in alternating white, light blue and dark blue page backgrounds. Not only is this visually appealing, but it provides a clear idea of when one section ends, and the other starts!

Fonts

Another absolutely essential thing to consider when designing your SaaS product landing page is the font you use. This will directly impact the text visibility, purely because certain fonts are harder to read than others.

The font you choose should be closely linked to your branding in order to create a visual association, and it needs to be easy to read. Most websites tend to use a sans-serif font, because it is much easier on the eye, and presents a more modern feel to it. Serif fonts are generally used when a formal tone is required.

Now that we’ve had a look at some of the important visual design elements, let’s jump in to what else you can display on your landing page in order to really make it stand out:

Header

Simple landing page design for your tech product

A header or “Hero” is arguably the most important thing you should display on your landing page. The header will be the first impression of your product, so it needs to be eye catching and informative.

A typical page header will outline exactly what your product does, and how it can help your target demographic. As you can only fit a limited amount of information into a standard header, you should also inspire a sense of intrigue for your customer to click through the rest of your website and learn more about your product.

It’s important to note that your header should not be crowded or cluttered in any way.

How does your product help?

It’s essential to include a simple guideline on how your product will benefit a potential customer. As with everything else, this should be simple – do not over-complicate it, and make sure it looks pretty.

Depending on what you prefer, you may use a small infographic explaining your unique selling point or benefits in as few steps as possible, or a dynamic panel to engage viewers and encourage them to click through.

Pricing

The most important thing for any consumer to know is the price of what they purchase. You should make sure that your pricing structure is listed clearly on your landing page, as this is the first thing a potential customer will look at.

If you have multiple prices or packages, make sure these are displayed prominently where they can be easily viewed – you may also want to link them to a CTA, or call to action, where a user can simply click the package they’re interested in, and it will redirect them to a conversion page.

Conversion

This is the most important part for you, as any tech startup or business. The purpose of your landing page should be to convert a viewer into a subscriber.

If you’ve made sure that your landing page follows the above guidelines, you should have no trouble enticing new customers.

If you’ve chosen not to link your prices to a sign up form, you MUST have an easy sign-up option. These are most successful when used as the primary focus in the centre of the page. You might even put this in the header so it’s one of the first things people see so that as they learn about your product and your tech startup, they will know where they can go to sign-up to your mailing list.

Your CTA should be as simple as possible, and only ask for the bare minimum a customer needs to get started. The less information a customer initially needs to provide, the more likely they are to subscribe! Make it eye-catching so that it’s clear what action you want them to take.

Remember, conversion relies on a clever SaaS product landing page design, and where possible you should always make sure that you invest in a quality landing page.

If your tech startup needs some help, feel free to reach out where we can provide guidance and advice on your current landing page. If you’re at a loss with your brand, make sure you check out our article on 11 Tips to Building an Awesome Tech Brand.

Why Is Branding Essential for a Tech Startup in 2019? 7 important steps

In 2018, there where 8671 digital product launches by tech startups on Product Hunt alone. We know that branding your tech company is low down on the agenda when you’re starting out but hopefully in this article, we can convince you that, when the time is right, investing in a brand is a worthwhile decision.

If you’re unfamiliar with what Product Hunt is, it’s a platform for developers and teams to share their latest digfital tech product. Other users can “Upvote” or comment with support or questions on that product. Creators can hope that they receive enough upvotes on their product to hit the top of that day’s leaderboard. To give you an idea of the success of Product Hunt and its importance in the market, Google regularly shares their releases as well as highly influential product-makers.

Standing out as a tech startup is a big problem in this ever-expanding market. Although Product Hunt gives a product the glitz and glamour of being top of a leaderboard, there is very little to suggest that this will ever mean that the product will reach mass-appeal. Product Hunt is by developers for developers and there’s little room for creative expression other than that of the logo and app imagery.

Standing out is where branding comes in. Branding is, in most cases, under the umbrella of marketing. We believe it’s a blend of business strategy and creativity. Branding can not only enhance and improve your tech experience but it can grow your customer base while also driving effective company culture. Tech company branding is a lot more than just your logo, which we’ll get into below.

  1. What is brand in a nutshell?
  2. Why is branding important?
    1. Position in the market
    2. Perceived value
    3. Recognition
    4. More customers and referrals
    5. Engaged employees
    6. Stand out and build trust
    7. Clear direction

What is “brand” in a nutshell?

At its core, branding is a marketing tactic that helps identify you amongst your competitors. This can be done in a variety of ways. With tech branding, you want to leave the potential customer with a clear idea of the promise that you are making to them. That promise can be physical things like – we will make your life easier with our product – or it can be something slightly more intangible.

Take Coke for instance. Instead of selling the drink, Coke promises to sell you the idea of happiness, family or sharing. You want to be the sole provider to a clear solution to your customers problem and your brand gives you a voice to be able to achieve that.

Whatever your promise is, it should be consistent in everything you do. It should be a guiding light to all your marketing efforts but this doesn’t need to be just a fake marketing effort.

Tech company branding is often deeply rooted in the values and ideas of its founders so is often born from genuine beliefs. This should be enough to set you aside from your competitors because although your product might be similar to another tech product, you’re able to eke out the USP (‘Unique Selling Point’) and promise something deeper from these values. It’s important that your customer should feel that promise in the entire customer experience and this can only be achieved through a well-defined brand strategy.

A final point to make is that for your tech brand, and the following points to work, you must understand your customer. Who are you talking to and why? What are their pain points and how do you solve them? Only then, can you build something effective in your efforts.

We have a post on how to develop your tech brand strategy here.

So why is branding important for my tech startup?

Tech branding is so important for many reasons (both internal and external). From an internal perspective, it can help align key stakeholders in the business on why you are building your product or service. It highlights everyone’s understanding and it will mean you are all speaking the same language. The business should be geared towards the same objective so by going through the motions of developing your tech brand, this becomes clear. A great consequence of this is improved company culture – something that is integral to the success of any tech startup.

Position in the market

As mentioned, going through the motions of your brand strategy should identify your position in the market. Shouting about it is your way of standing out and setting yourself apart from the competition. Positioning is integral to standing out so we hold this process highly in a brand strategy workshop. Positioning is a huge topic in itself and when it comes to tech company branding, this is so important.

Perceived value

 A brand with a higher value (from investors etc.) is perceived to be a bigger market player. This allows you more leverage and increased investment opportunities as your brand should represent establishment, confidence and success. If your tech startup can be perceived as valuable, you’re likely to become attractive to investors.

Recognition

As a tech startup, in a sea of competition, recognition is also important. Having an attractive and engaging tech brand is one way to stand out. It’s also another way to remain in the minds of the consumer. Launching a new product becomes easier as the customer will be familiar with your brand. Everyone can recognise Google products when they see them. They all use similar colours and illustration style. It’s important to remember though the visual appeal that Google has is rooted in a powerful branding strategy.

Building tech brand recognition also builds brand equity and so improves the chances that if you seek investment, you’re more likely to appeal to investors. This is because your brand equity is strong and this builds on the value we spoke of previously.

More Customers and referrals

When you engage with your customers (either physically or digitally) you should give them a great service, and believe it or not, by having your tech branding consistently play a part in that process, it’s a way to drive up customer satisfaction. Their impression of your tech startup’s branding is further imprinted in their mind with every successful engagement.

Happy customers also mean you’re likely to get referred as that customer seeks to recruit more into the brand ecosystem (tribe).

Note: A concept called “brand tribalism” also contributes to the fact that raving fans will want to refer their friends. We won’t go into brand tribalism now but it essentially means that customers buy into the feeling it gives them. Sometimes they buy that more than the product itself and this is an important thing to remember with regard to your tech startup branding.

Engaged employees

From the offset, if your tech brand is strong you’re likely to attract a specific kind of employee -hopefully one that aligns with the values you are trying to convey in your branding. When your employees believe in the values themselves and are encouraged they are likely to be proud and become a raving fan of their employer. They will also have a greater sense of belonging which is what we all pine for. They will feel like they are part of something bigger! We know that culture is a huge part of a positive atmosphere so if you have everyone believing in the same thing, you’re going to have a good atmosphere. Happy employees are more engaged, more involved, harder working and stay dedicated to the business for longer than one that isn’t engaged.

Stand out and build trust

Having strong tech branding is a sure-fire way of looking professional, established and legitimate. As a growing tech startup brand, you’re likely to feel a bit of imposter syndrome sometimes and taking on tech giants can be a daunting task. With a strong product paired with a great technology brand, you’ll stand out and build trust within the market. People will be more likely to engage and purchase from you if they trust you and a well-put-together tech brand looks like a well-put-together business. This will lead on to gaining loyal followers and subsequently repeat purchases.

Clear and easy direction

Finally, having a set of brand guidelines and a clear idea of the message your tech startup branding wants to convey is a huge weight off your shoulders. A lot of the heavy lifting has already been done for you allowing you to focus on more important things (the product). Getting the right emotional and visual direction nailed means you can forget about wondering if you’re conveying the right message and trust in the brand working its magic. This in itself is worth thousands in terms of cash as the time saved is phenominal.

So as you can see, having effective branding for tech companies matters so much more than just the appearance of your website or the design of your logo. There are clear benefits to it both internally and externally that you can leverage and utilise so we suggest this being one of the first thing your tech startup addresses early and often. It’s also really important to keep revisiting your tech company’s branding every 6 months not only from a visual perspective but from a business alignment perspective.

10 Practical Tips on How to Run an Effective Remote Brand Strategy Workshop

Brand Strategy (Strategy) is our name for the discovery process we run to unlock hidden knowledge in the minds of our clients. As a remote design studio, this poses some immediate problems on how to run an effective workshop when you aren’t in the room.

It’s important to say that every detail discussed below is client dependent. These won’t necessarily apply to all clients so discuss with them what they are comfortable with. This guide can also serve to answer questions like “Ways to improve Voice over IP (VoIP) quality?”, “What are the best times to schedule a meeting?” and “How to run a VoIP meeting or workshop?”.

Brand strategy workshops tips

Brand strategy helps us maximise the value of delivery and narrow our design efforts by asking key questions right at the beginning of the project. We’ve written an article on what Brand Strategy is so we won’t bore you with that. Strategy can run for at least four hours if pushed for time but it can also run for days. It depends on how many people are in the room and how many voices need to be heard. We look at things like brand positioning, brand architecture, users, business goals and more.

Discovery workshops run best when you can motivate people to be hands-on and energetic as they participate. Strategy requires active participation from key stakeholders in the organisation. This means post-it exercises and creative thinking all-round. As a facilitator, you also need to be aware of the energy levels in the room and be able to read people easily enough to spot the tell-tail signs of fatigue. It’s good to be aware so that you can call for a break or engage a particular participant to bring them back into the room.

1. Break it up

Break up the workshop for an effective remote brand strategy workshop

You need to be pro-active in your approach to minimising fatigue, maximising energy and increasing engagement. Rather than push attendees until they are tired, we reimagine the discovery process so that they never get tired in the first place. After some testing, we found attendees start to tire after about 1 hour of workshopping over Zoom. We took a look at our Strategy workshop and have now broken it up logically into 1 – 1.5-hour segments. This enables us to get everything covered without losing context and before attendees tire. We suggest breaking your workshops up into logical chunks while keeping context.

How you break it up will depend on whether you’re in the same time-zones or not. Most segments are run once a day but if you are in a similar time-zone you might be able to run it several times in a day.

A benefit to meeting each day is that the chit-chat at the beginning of the call often involves catch up on the rest of the previous day. Because of this, we feel like we were all part of each others entire day. Each day we bond and grow as a team over the course of a week which puts us in a better position going forward and as ultimately we have a better relationship right from the beginning.

2. Homework

give client homework for an effective remote brand strategy workshop

Not necessary in every workshop but homework is also something we offer. Some of the tasks in the workshop are quite frankly repetitive. An example being user personas. If we can clearly facilitate the first persona then that is often enough for the participants to build out the other personas without our involvement. We could oversee the second persona for instance with little input and leave the remaining 1 or 2 to the participants.

The other benefit of having homework is time. Depending on the client, we feel having a 1-hour touchpoint a day can leave all involved twiddling their thumbs a little. A session that could run over 1 or 2 days is stretched out over the course of a week which could be less than ideal. With homework, this isn’t the case and the session remains productive outside the call.

3. Invest in good quality hardware

invest in good quality hardware for an effective remote brand strategy workshop

It’s hard to engage your client so make sure they can see and hear you as if you’re in the room. Use HD camera with a decent microphone. The best according to many studies is the Logitech C922 Pro Stream. This enables 1080p streaming. An added bonus to this webcam is that it has fantastic stereo audio. It also has a wide viewing angle (78-degree) to capture a decent amount of you.

If you’re wanting better quality from your audio then invest in a decent microphone. Blue Yeti Pro USB Condenser Microphone is often rated very highly and is simple to use. With built-in noise cancelling, stereo recording and you don’t need a USB audio interface and it will just work right out of the box.

4. Choose time wisely

Choose time wisely for an effective remote brand strategy workshop

Choosing the right time of day to run brand strategy is very important to maximise productivity. Obviously being remote you sometimes don’t have that luxury as you might be in different time-zones but we should discuss this nonetheless. Monday’s aren’t great for meetings and neither are Friday’s as they are both impacted by the weekend. On Monday’s, people are still thinking about the weekend and are in “weekend mode” and on Friday’s, people are gearing up for the weekend so might lack focus.

Try to avoid mornings

We need our participants engaged and energetic in brand strategy as we require active thinking and participation. It’s creative too and some attendees might not have a creative bone in their body so will require being tempted out of their comfort zones. In the morning, people are still sleepy and this is not good.

Mid-mornings are ideal

People are most energetic in the mid-morning so utilising this burst of energy is recommended – 10am is a great time. If you’re running one brand strategy session per day, then running it at 10am each day is perfect. If it’s not your 10am, bring your A-game! One thing to be conscious of is running close too lunch. People can get hangry (hungry + angry) just before lunch so finishing at around 11:30/45 is ideal.

Lunchtimes can work

As long as you provide food you can run a meeting over lunch. It’s a great way to squeeze in some more time and can help post-lunch productivity if food is chosen wisely (sandwiches and salads come to mind. Avoid stodge) as explained below…

Don’t schedule meetings straight after lunch.

I think this goes without saying as we all know how we feel after a big lunch. Unless you run your brand strategy over lunch and you can somehow control peoples consumption.

Late afternoon isn’t ideal

People are clock-watching from around 4:30pm so finish up by that. It could be a great time if you’re doing introductions or need to rattle through some loose ends as people will be wanting to get home so could be achieved in record time.

In conclusion, have your brand strategy at 10am between Tuesday and Thursday as people are energised and focussed. If you’re running several in a day, try to avoid having more than two and make the second at around 2:30pm.

Consider evenings

Depending on the profile of the company, you might be dealing with busy senior staff. As with all brand strategy sessions, you should be running it with the C-suite stakeholders. You need fundamental information and most importantly, with regards to brand, you need buy-in. If they are busy, float the option of an evening or before work (if they are hyper-productive). This can even work for time-zones that don’t sync up so bear that in mind.

5. Prepare your client

Make sure your client knows what they need for the session. Post-its? Pre-call considerations (such as competitors). Think about what you would need from them in the room and prepare them before the call. We do this in the meeting invite as well as verbally. In our case, we do introductions on the first call so nothing is needed. This gives us an opportunity to tell them what they will need going forward and to look to the invites for further information. Then we, of course, provide information in the invites.

6. Have good Wifi in a quiet area

Have good wifi for an effective remote brand strategy workshop

I think this point goes without saying. VoIP calls are bandwidth-intensive so make sure you and your client(s) have good Wifi. Book a room so that it both looks professional and people aren’t moving around in the background and most importantly, make sure it’s quiet. If you have an ethernet connection, this is far more reliable than Wifi, so use it.

Also, bonus tip – try not to have the call in what can only be described as a cave!

7. Have backup options if disaster strikes

One reason why we use Zoom is that it gives the client WORLDWIDE teleconference capabilities. Sometimes things don’t go according to plan and a good old fashioned phone call is necessary. Having that option and being prepared to be a little more descriptive with your workshop activities can reduce time. With Zoom, clients can call a local number to attend the session.

8. Record the calls

If you have a terrible memory or your handwriting is poor consider recording your calls for future reference. We create a summary document of the brand strategy call and although we fill out the keynote as we go along, we sometimes need to clarify something or add additional context or information. If you have recorded the call you can simply go back over it and watch for the information. We then share our calls on a privately hosted Youtube. This not only saves storage on our computers but is easily accessed by everyone.

9. Clarify your instructions

Clarify instructions for an effective remote brand strategy workshop

If you’re giving instructions always clarify if they make sense and give your client the option to speak up. This is just polite during a meeting especially if acronyms or industry-specific terminology is thrown around but especially in VoIP calls as the call may have dropped and not everything will have been heard.

10. Stand Up

Stand up to give an effective remote brand strategy session

This sounds strange but you need to give 50% more energy on a video call to get just 10% output on the other end. Help generate that energy by standing. Get the blood flowing and don’t allow your body to get lazy.

So there you have it. 10 considerations for having a productive remote client discovery workshop. We offer brand strategy workshop after a free 1-hour consultation – just contact us on our website. Give it a try and let us know if you have any tips for remote discovery calls.

Photography lovingly used from Unsplash